Jul 21, 2014
peoplefor:

Check out the full report on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s history of dissenting for democracy: www.pfaw.org/RBG

I quit art, because nothing I do will ever compare to this masterpiece by alexandrahart.

peoplefor:

Check out the full report on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s history of dissenting for democracy: www.pfaw.org/RBG

I quit art, because nothing I do will ever compare to this masterpiece by alexandrahart.

Jul 1, 2014
jensorensen:

"Buffer Zone Buffoonery" by @JenSorensen

jensorensen:

"Buffer Zone Buffoonery" by @JenSorensen

Jun 12, 2014
Jun 12, 2014

huffingtonpost:

President Obama came down hard on gun-control laws during today’s Tumblr Q&A. See the president’s full response on gun control here.

(via humanrightswatch)

May 28, 2014

Pretty women wonder where my secret lies.
I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size
But when I start to tell them,
They think I’m telling lies.
I say,
It’s in the reach of my arms,
The span of my hips,
The stride of my step,
The curl of my lips.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

I walk into a room
Just as cool as you please,
And to a man,
The fellows stand or
Fall down on their knees.
Then they swarm around me,
A hive of honey bees.
I say,
It’s the fire in my eyes,
And the flash of my teeth,
The swing in my waist,
And the joy in my feet.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Men themselves have wondered
What they see in me.
They try so much
But they can’t touch
My inner mystery.
When I try to show them,
They say they still can’t see
I say,
It’s in the arch of my back,
The sun of my smile,
The ride of my breasts,
The grace of my style.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Now you understand
Just why my head’s not bowed.
I don’t shout or jump about
Or have to talk real loud.
When you see me passing,
It ought to make you proud.
I say,
It’s in the click of my heels,
The bend of my hair,
The palm of hand,
The need for my care.
‘Cause I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Maya Angelou, “Phenomenal Woman”
May 22, 2014

The New Deal is today remembered as a model for what progressive government should do—cast a broad social safety net that protects the poor and the afflicted while building the middle class. When progressives wish to express their disappointment with Barack Obama, they point to the accomplishments of Franklin Roosevelt. But these progressives rarely note that Roosevelt’s New Deal, much like the democracy that produced it, rested on the foundation of Jim Crow.

'The Jim Crow South,' writes Ira Katznelson, a history and political-science professor at Columbia, 'was the one collaborator America’s democracy could not do without.' The marks of that collaboration are all over the New Deal. The omnibus programs passed under the Social Security Act in 1935 were crafted in such a way as to protect the southern way of life. Old-age insurance (Social Security proper) and unemployment insurance excluded farmworkers and domestics—jobs heavily occupied by blacks. When President Roosevelt signed Social Security into law in 1935, 65 percent of African Americans nationally and between 70 and 80 percent in the South were ineligible. The NAACP protested, calling the new American safety net 'a sieve with holes just big enough for the majority of Negroes to fall through.'

Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Case for Reparations,” The Atlantic
May 16, 2014
May 8, 2014

thrillmington:

You need a new man.

"Ladies, if your man’s Ja Rule impression sounds too much like his Mystikal impression, get a new man. Quickly."

Apr 30, 2014
Apr 17, 2014
To the creepy fashion blog that just followed me ( yes, you the never-ending listicle of indistinguishable, emaciated, dead-eyed young white women in white dresses ) this is how I feel about you and everything you have to offer.

To the creepy fashion blog that just followed me ( yes, you the never-ending listicle of indistinguishable, emaciated, dead-eyed young white women in white dresses ) this is how I feel about you and everything you have to offer.

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